REVIEW: THE BONE CLOCKS by David Mitchell

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THE BONE CLOCKS by David MItchell

RATING: 4/5

[Amazon| Hachette AU ]

Read  David Mitchell’s book fills my head and gives me satisfaction. In “The Bone Clocks” as well as in the much more famous, and my absolute favorite “Cloud Atlas”, the story is not linear, but rather arranged in a concentric structure. It is six stories, each set in different moments of Holly Sykes’s life , in a span of time from 1984 until 2043. And it is the time, its flow, which constantly stand in the  background of this story.

I always admired the ability of Mitchell to handle so many characters and stories without neglecting anyone. His skill in interweaving stories result in a harmonious and perfect mix, where every details works perfectly togheter as well as the wheels of a clock fit together with each other and move the hands. The result is a kaleidoscope of events and details. Nothing is random, each character is unique and seems to live, perfectly characterized, and balanced in his role.

“Do you ever … know stuff, Holly? Stuff that you cannot possibly know, yet … Or—or lose hours. Not as in, ‘Wow, time flies,’ but as in,” I click my fingers, “there, an hour’s gone. Literally, between one heartbeat and the next. Well, maybe the time thing’s a red herring, but I know my life’s changing.
— The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

This is not a simple novel, you must overcome the initial confusion and read it to the end to be able to understand. This is a book that has the ability to confuse you completely, resulting chaotic and incomprehensible, presenting stories that the eye of an inexperienced reader who for the first time read Mitchell, can seems completely incongruous and diabolicly labyrinthine, discouraging the reading. But if you insist, if you continues, you’ll realize the presence of a file rouge that binds them all. Is perceived as a single event could trigger a chain reaction that shapes the future and the unfolding of the story itself.

“The Bone Clocks” can be defined as a fantasy, but not the classic type. You will not find wizards or magic, but a struggle between good and evil that is taking place since a long time, out of time and for the time and invisible to us bone’s clocks, destined to grow old and die. It is a reading that starts slow but fluid, evolving into a crescendo of events and revelations that make impossible to put down the book. A clear and direct language without frills and not too descriptive. Until the end I loved Hugo Lamb, my absolute favorite character and the part I least liked, but I was definitely impressed from,  was the final one that I found, alas, slow and is the cause of the lack of the fifth star. For once, I think that the Italian translated title ” The Invisible Hours” is more appropriate than the original. In short, I really enjoyed it, although not as Cloud Atlas, which for me is the best.

“For one voyage to begin, another voyage must come to an end, sort of.”

Absolutely Recommended

Erica

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